Ido Fishman’s Guide to Fixing Common Cooking Blunders

Mistakes happen when you are cooking, but what is important is to learn from these mistakes. Everyone has to start somewhere and you can learn some very valuable lessons from your mistakes. The key is to be able to identify your mistakes, fix them or prevent them from happening in the first place. Ido Fishman has provided some guidance to help people in fixing some common cooking blunders. What are they? Take a look below:

  • Adding too much salt to the dish

This happens more often than you would think adding unsalted liquid, such as stock or low-sodium broth can do the trick. Ido Fishman suggests that you try adding an acid, such as vinegar or lemon juice, for toning down the flavor. However, this only masks the salt and doesn’t remove it.

  • Raw chicken from the middle

If the chicken is still raw from the middle when you cut it open, you should obviously continue cooking. It is best to sear the exposed exterior or else all the juices will come out and then continue cooking until it is done. Rather than cutting it open, Ido Fishman recommends that you use a thermometer to check the temperature and identify whether it is done or not.

  • Burning the bottom of the pot

In case there is still food in the burnt pot, you will want to transfer it to a new pot straight away. The longer the food stays in the burnt pot, it will take on the flavor. As soon as you have transferred it, fill the burnt pot with a thin layer of baking soda and vinegar and scrub off the burnt bits.

  • Wilted fresh greens

Submerge the sad-looking, wilted fresh greens in a large bowl of ice water and let them soak for about 30 minutes to an hour. You can remove the leaves and use a salad spinner or paper towel to dry them. As per Ido Fishman, they will not be perky and nice.

  • Pasta sticking together

This is a common complaint that people have when they are trying to cook pasta. Bear in mind that the pasta most likely sticks together if the water is not at a rolling boil. You should also continue stirring in the first few minutes because that’s when it is most likely going to stick. If the pasta sticks after you have cooked it, you can break it up gently and add some olive oil to keep it that way.

  • The juices from the meat end up on the cutting board

Unless you want all the juices from your meat flowing on the cutting board, the Ido Fishman blog suggests that you let the proteins rest for about five to seven minutes after cooking it, before you start cutting. This applies to chicken breasts, steaks and pork. If you cut them straight off, they will lose a lot of moisture and will dry out in a bit. Allow them to rest and you will have a juicy and nice piece of meat.

  • Melted chocolate is clumpy and dry

When this happens, it means that your chocolate is seized i.e. it has come into contact with water. To put it simply, chocolate and water don’t mix and you should use dry tools and not allow any water droplets to hit the chocolate. If you do have seized chocolate, Ido Fishman suggests that you add a tablespoon of boiling water to it until it becomes smooth. This may sound a bit counterintuitive, but is actually effective.

  • Burnt garlic

The next time you are using garlic for cooking, add it later to the pan because it usually burns when it is added early on and gets too much time to cook. Also, don’t add garlic to a super-hot pan because it doesn’t do well with high temperatures.

Use this guide and you will be able to avoid these mistakes and have a smooth time cooking.

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